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Restore your precious memories….

Time and tide wait for no one – you may remember it just like it was yesterday, every moment and detail of that special day vivid in your minds eye, the photograph on the wall may not have fared so well however.  All photographs fade and loose their lustre over time, you may have worn pure white on your wedding day but the photo on the wall tells the world it was dirty yellow.  At Farlco Digital Imaging we can restore those prints to their former glory, helping those of us with cloudy memories lift the veil and remember those moments as they were.

Colin Farrell

Farlco Digital Imaging

www.farlco.com

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Beauty Retouch Again

Image Courtesy of Dallas J Logan

This image is another one submitted on the the Model Mayhem website for retouching.  The photographer in this case was Dallas J Logan, from Brooklyn in NYC.  Most of the retouching on the skin was achieved by painting with a small low opacity brush (4-7%) set to either black (burn) or white (dodge) on a 50% gray layer set to the soft light blending mode.  The clone stamp and healing brush were used sparingly on the the skin, apart from removing or reducing some of the major blemishes, but quite a bit on the hair.

Cheers

Colin

 
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Posted by on June 15, 2010 in Image Editing, Photoshop, Retouch

 

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High pass an Old Man

The high pass filter is often overlooked as a method of sharpening in Photoshop perhaps because it is not grouped with the other sharpen filters hidden away as it is in the “other”  section of the filter menu.  Of course sharpening really is increasing the contrast of neighbouring light and dark pixels. The typical implementation of the filter is to duplicate the background layer apply a low pixel radius high pass filter and change the blending mode of the layer to overlay and adjust the opacity of the layer to taste.  The soft light blending mode has a less harsh sharpening effect and hard light and linear light have harsher effects.  I find the filter useful for sharpening images that have well defined edges already such as architectural images and less so for portraits as it can be quite unflattering, incidentally an inverted high pass filter is useful for portraits for a quick smoothing of skin (used with layer mask and low opacity layer).  In the example here I used the filter to exaggerate the lines on the old mans face, I duplicated the high pass layer a few times and also used a number of other blending mode techniques to desaturate and tone the image.  As with all blending modes a little experimentation can yield pleasing results……

Before

 

After

Cheers Colin

 
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Posted by on May 26, 2010 in Image Editing, Photoshop, Retouch

 

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Bleach beach Girl

I found this contemplative portrait of a young girl on a beach on the free stock site http://www.sxc.hu.  Overall I thought the image had a nice feel to it – it was let down by by being too flat and being too warm (overly red).  So naturally for a beach shot I decided to cool it down substantially and increase the contrast………

 
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Posted by on May 3, 2010 in Image Editing, Photoshop, Retouch

 

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Model Mayhem Beauty Retouch

Model Mayhem (http://www.modelmayhem.com/) is a website community for models, photographers and photoshop “wizards” (their term not mine!) etc.  On one of the forums people submit sample images for retouching, I happened on the image below from photographer Carol Lee from Texas (Mayhem #1216562) on this thread http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=550304 .  The extent of the retouch is quite extreme, I spent a couple of hours on it – but it shows what can be done with less than perfect skin…

Cheers

Colin

Original Photo Carol Lee

 

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Studio Retouch

Stuart over at Ebony & Pearl photography (great photographer check out their website) gave me a couple of great studio shots to retouch, giving me free reign to play around with as I saw fit, cheers Stuart!. This particular shot I decided to give a grittier look to…..

Daniel Photographed by Stuart McNamara

Daniel Photographed by Stuart McNamara

 
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Posted by on March 16, 2010 in Image Editing, Photoshop, Retouch

 

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How to add a tattoo with photoshop

In this tutorial I will use the brush I created in the previous tutorial to tattoo someone. The image of the bloke who will be my victim can be found on sxc.hu – 493495_92373417 – if you wish to follow along.
1. Open the image and duplicate it, convert to black and white (by whatever means you wish) and increase its contrast a little, save this file in a .psd format on your desktop. This file is what you are going use as a displacement map. A displacement map uses the tones in a grayscale image to distort the pixels of a target to match the contours of the source image.
2. Go back to the original and create a new blank layer above the background.
3. Select the cross brush as created in the tutorial below and paint onto this layer. Position and scale into position.
4. Next select Filter> Distort> Displace, in the resulting dialog box I set both the horizontal and vertical scale to 5 leaving the other option to their defaults. The is no preview with this dialog so you will have to experiment with different settings depending on your image and its resolution, but generally I find a displacement scale of 5 to 10 works well.
5. When you hit ok navigate to the black & whit image you created in step 1 and chose it.
6. In order to blend the tattoo even further it is necessary to experiment with blending modes, which ones you will choose is not set in stone as it depends on what you are blending and to what. I duplicated the layer twice applied a colour blending mode at 55% opacity to the bottom layer, a 60% overlay blending mode to the middle layer, and a 30% mulitply blending mode to the top layer.The colour, overlay, multiply and hard light blending modes work best when trying to blend layers like this.

7. Flatten the image and you’re done.  In the final image you see below I did a small amount of image enhancement to give the image more impact.Cheers
Colin

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2010 in Image Editing, Photoshop, Retouch